Part 1: Failing spectacularly makes for rapid learning

Sarah Vaughan

Having recently read about the new Oxford University vaccine, it was deeply encouraging to learn how Britain’s wealthiest academic institution accidentally stumbled across their solution. Yes, rather than it being a fundamental part, of a meticulously planned scientific test, the vaccine appears to have been discovered by error. Good ol classic human error!  

Whether it is a driving test (ahem a few times…shame emoji), or an exam, not giving up is a sign of incredible resilience. When I reflect on our learners today, be they K12 pupils, students in Higher Education, or reskilling adults and what they have been through this year, I can only salute and admire their tenacity and drive to keep on keeping on. Even in the grimmest of circumstances. A year when the word ‘social’, became synonymous with leper, and peer-based, or group-led, community-centred learning was confined behind pixels.  

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Speaking more broadly, one thing I admire about the Higher Education sector is its ability to embrace failure and adapt to learn. The academic sector's flexibility, and ongoing commitment to continuous improvement, using community-driven processes and peer-review methods.    

So, as we all stumble out of 2020 like bedraggled Armageddon escapees, knackered but not defeated. The critical Human Factor for me has been resolve, or will, as it is commonly known. Once you crack the empowerment code, coupled with your desire to improve, it becomes imperative to get back on the horse, mule, or your public transportation vessel of choice. We must all now find the resolve to keep learning, keep improving and continue educating ourselves to grow, that is what this year has been all about 

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Sage article: Cloud adoption, why you should work on supporting your employees first

Manufacturers can save time, effort and money through cloud adoption projects. Around one third of UK manufacturers purchased cloud computing services in 2020. Most would have done so to make the most of well-known benefits such as improved productivity, accessibility, reporting and data security, as well as lower operating and IT costs. However, if you’re looking at cloud adoption for your manufacturing firm, it’s really important that your people are a key part of the process. Rather than implementing the changes then informing your employees, they should be involved from the start. Read this article to find out why your employees should play a role during every step of your cloud journey, how to support them, and how to avoid potential pitfalls within your team. After all, you don’t want to get this wrong and pay a hefty price for delays or even lose key people.

Sysdoc

Lessons from Consortium working

An introduction to my experience At the beginning of this year, I started a new project working with a new client and taking on a new role for a large transformation programme. I have worked alongside other consultancies on previous programmes in the past, but this was a first for me, working within a partnership from the offset.

Chloe Lewis

Why Process Excellence is key for a successful ERP Implementation

I have been reflecting on my experiences working on ERP implementation/upgrade programmes whilst also listening and hearing to what others have to say. I think back to these projects and notice everyone was working hectically towards the programme ‘Go – Live’ and were under the impression that once they achieved this Go - Live then we have successfully implemented a new ERP System and our job is complete. I think many people can agree with me that a Go – Live date is just the start of the journey.  We have got to think about the people, culture, education, efficiency in processes and where can we reduce ‘waste’.

Bhavisha Kataria